THW 2022 Mock NHL Draft Round 2: Our Armchair GMs Make Their Picks

If you enjoyed the first-round writers mock draft here at The Hockey Writers, well then, you got another treat with the second-round mock draft. 

Similar to last year, we got together with our team and they made their selections through two rounds. This post will cover the first round and the second round will be posted at a later date. I will also be giving my thoughts on each selection on why the writer made that pick. 

Related: THW 2022 Mock NHL Draft Round 1: Our Armchair GMs Make Their Picks

While the picks mostly fell into place in the first round, with a few surprises here and there, the second round offers a few more surprises and selections. Especially with some names that could have been selected within the first round. Without further ado, here is the second-round mock draft.

NOTE: Much like the first round, the selections made here will differ to what the final positioning is as it was done before it was finalized. Also, a compensatory draft pick was given to the Minnesota Wild for not signing Filip Johansson and was not counted as part of our mock. 

33. Montreal Canadiens: David Goyette – C, Sudbury Wolves (OHL)

THW Writer: Blain Potvin

In the second round it was time to swing for the fences. Picking David Goyette from the Sudbury Wolves gives the team another speedy player for the system. He can generate offence on his own and loves to play a possession game, which is exactly what the Canadiens are aiming to build. As a rookie, he was the top line center for Sudbury scoring 33 goals and was over a point per game. He will be looked to for more offence as well as some leadership next season. 

David Goyette of the Sudbury Wolves
David Goyette of the Sudbury Wolves (Photo by Robert Lefebvre /OHL Images)

Baracchini’s Take

After taking Shane Wright first overall, the Canadiens continue to fill out their centre depth with Goyette. A highly skilled playmaker with some of the best hands in the draft, Goyette is able to deke and evade opponents effortlessly. There are times where he can be a risk taker and can lead to a broken play or turnover, but it’s hard not to deny the high-end skill and upside that he has.

34. Arizona Coyotes: Lane Hutson – D, USNTDP (USHL)

THW Writer: Andrew Forbes

Another left-handed option on the back end, Lane Hutson offers a little more mobility to the Coyotes’ defensive prospects. He’s smaller than Pickering, but is a puck-mover with great vision. His zone exits compliment his passing ability and makes him a viable second-pairing option down the road. His offensive numbers will stand out with 95 points in 87 games between the USHL and USDP in 2021-22 and some of that can be attributed to his skating. His acceleration is top-notch and that gives him the extra step on the opposition when turning the play back towards the offensive zone. Hutson is a solid option at this point in the draft. 

Related: THW 2022 NHL Draft Guide

Baracchini’s Take

This pick reminds me of the Anaheim Ducks drafting a smaller defender with high offensive upside in Olen Zellweger at this same spot in 2021. What Hutson lacks in size, he makes up for it with his deceptive and shifty game. He plays with such confidence with the puck as he’s strong in transition and makes plays at a quick pace. With Jakob Chychrun’s status still up in the air, adding Hutson is a move that’ll pay off with his work ethic and dynamic puck moving abilities.

35. Seattle Kraken: Christian Kyrou – D, Erie Otters (OHL)

THW Writer: Sean Raggio

Two of the biggest needs that Seattle Kraken general manager Ron Francis needs to address are adding right-handed defensemen, and blue line offensive production. Christian Kyrou can bring that in a big way. The Kraken were 29th in the NHL on the power play this past season, and with his vision and passing ability, he could turn into their power play quarterback. He scored 18 goals, third in the OHL for goals by a defenseman this past season, and to have that kind of firepower and willingness to shoot from the backend could take some offensive pressure off their other defensemen. No disrespect to Carson Soucy, but his job isn’t to lead the team in goals by a defenseman. 

Christian Kyrou Erie Otters
Christian Kyrou, Erie Otters (Photo by Luke Durda/OHL Images)

Baracchini’s Take

One of the biggest surprises in the second half of the season is Kyrou, as he has done a great job of pushing himself into the second round. He’s just as quick as his older brother, St. Louis Blues forward Jordan, and the skillset is just as evident. As a defender, Christian’s great in transition, can make strong reads and plays on the breakout and is a big factor in the offensive zone getting pucks on net or setting plays up. He can be over aggressive and needs to improve defensively, but he definitely proved his worth.  

36. Arizona Coyotes (via Philadelphia Flyers): Gleb Trikozov – C/RW, Omskie Yastreby (MHL)

THW Writer: Andrew Forbes

Mixing it up a little bit, Trikozov is an option for the Coyotes to take and develop as a winger within the organization. Another kid sitting over six feet and just shy of 200 pounds, Trikozov has size to play along the boards during puck battles in the offensive zone. While he has some holes in his game – including his two-way game – his skill set could land him an NHL spot at some point in the next few years. Still, there are some questions around how well he will transition to the NHL level, but that could just be a bump in the road and depend on how he carries that over to North America and whether or not he can develop with fit the style of play over here. He’s got a lot of high-end skill and that should overshadow his inconsistencies. He should be a middle-six forward at the NHL level for some time. 

Baracchini’s Take

The first the steal of the second round. Trikozov has the mindset, skill and smarts to be a first-round selection. I would’ve thought that he would be gone in the 18-22 range. Yet, here we are with the Coyotes taking a hard-working winger with an aggressive attitude when on the attack, but can play a responsible game on the back check and within his own zone. He’s an absolute force when he’s on the ice as he’s always persistent with his pursuit of the puck.

37. New Jersey Devils: Filip Mešár – C/W, HK Propad (Slovakia)

THW Writer: Alex Chauvancy

I wrote Mešár’s draft profile a few weeks ago and was thrilled he was available with the 37th pick. I don’t think he’ll still be on the board at the actual draft, but the Devils would be getting a steal. A consensus first-round pick and even a top-15 prospect from services, Mešár has quite a bit of upside. He’s a very good skater with great edgework who excels in transition. He has a good shot but also has strong playmaking and stickhandling abilities. He can play on the wing or down the middle, but he likely projects as a wing in the NHL. Though I don’t think he has the upside of Jesper Bratt, there are some similarities between the two players. If Mešár hits his ceiling, he could be a high-end, second-line scoring winger. 

Baracchini’s Take

Really surprised to see Mešár fall as far as he did. It’s the Devils gain, as Alex makes the best comparison with Bratt as Mešár’s best comparable. A high-energy winger with good upside and the potential to be a player that could break out at some point down the line with his offensive skillset. The Devils took Slafkovsky with first line potential on the wing. Adding his fellow countryman and a future second-line winger is definitely a great move as he’s another player that should’ve been off the board in the first round.

38: Chicago Blackhawks: Tristan Luneau – RD, Gatineau Olympique (QMJHL)

THW Writer: Shawn Wilken

As expected, Tristan Luneau’s stock takes a bit of a hit and the Blackhawks would be ecstatic to snag a quality defensive prospect like him. He’s a big-bodied, sturdy blueliner who can move the puck well, quarterback a powerplay, and he’s capable of throwing big hits too. Over the last two years with the Gatineau Olympiques, he’s grown from an offensive defenseman to one that excels at both ends of the ice. With room to grow and add muscle, and some time spent further developing his defensive game, Luneau could be a future top-four defenseman in Chicago. 

Tristan Luneau Gatineau Olympiques
Tristan Luneau, Gatineau Olympiques (Dominic Charette/Gatineau Olympiques)

Baracchini’s Take

Luneau was always at the top of my list of defenders. While he may have slipped, the promise and potential remains as he has the work ethic, awareness and mobility to be a strong two-way defender. He dealt with an injury and struggles at the beginning of the season, but he managed to find that consistency later on and still finish top-15 in scoring among defensemen in the Quebec Major Junior League. His defensive abilities are just as impressive as he does a great job to pressure the puck carrier and get into the passing lanes. The Blackhawks could use some more defensemen with offense to their game and Luneau has that. 

39. Ottawa Senators: Mattias Hävelid – RD, Linköping HC (SHL)

THW Writer: Dayton Reimer

The Senators missed out on grabbing one of David Jiricek or Simon Nemec in this draft, so with their first second-round pick, they’ll look to add a puck-moving right-handed defender, and the best one available is Hävelid. He’s a little undersized at 5-foot-10, but he’s been an offensive catalyst for Sweden.

Related: 2022 NHL Draft’s Top 10 Swedish Prospects

At the U18 World Junior Championships, he notched 12 points in six games to lead all defencemen in scoring and nearly all players (only Jonathan Lekkerimäki outscored him). Some may be hesitant to get their hopes up after seeing the struggles with Erik Brannstrom, who plays a very similar style, but with Lekkerimäki already in the fold, Hävelid should be able to transition well to the NHL if given time to build a bit more muscle and iron out his all-around game. 

Baracchini’s Take

Aside from Lassi Thomson– who is working his way into the pro level– the Senators don’t have any strong puck-moving defenders. Hävelid gives them that player that can be quick in transition and high offensive upside with his pace to drive the play. He stood out at the World U18 Championship, being a powerhouse on the blueline with his production, quick skating and puck handling. 

40. Detroit Red Wings: Elias Solomonsson – D, Skellefteå AIK (SHL)

THW Writer: Devin Little

Despite the Red Wings already possessing a number of quality defensive prospects, it never hurts to add a few more when you can. Furthermore, most of that defensive depth is provided by left-handed prospects, so adding Solomonsson provides the Wings with a bit of a project pick on the right side of the blue line. In short, if Solomonsson hits his peak, he’ll become a mobile, puck-moving defender with good size and good offensive instincts. His defensive game does need work, and his ability to round out his game in his own end will ultimately determine whether or not he can play in the NHL. He is cut from the same cloth as current Red Wings defender Filip Hronek, and the opportunity to add another Swede to Detroit’s system was too good to pass up. 

Baracchini’s Take

Salomonsson is a difficult prospect to get a handle on. He has great mobility, offensive instincts and strength. But his decision making defensively and within his own zone hasn’t been strong this season. Some see him as a first-round talent, others see him falling outside in the second round as a result. If there’s any team to help him out and develop a steady defensive game, it’s the Red Wings.

41. Buffalo Sabres: Ty Nelson – RD, North Bay Battalion (OHL)

THW Writer: Matthews Zator

Ty Nelson rounds out the selections for the Sabres in the first two rounds as he becomes the first d-man to be selected after they took Owen Power in 2021. Dynamic as they come, Nelson was compared to none other than Morgan Rielly of the Toronto Maple Leafs by THW’s own Alex Hobson. Mostly due to his skating style, but still, that’s a heck of a comparison considering he is one of the best offensive defencemen in the NHL right now. Unlike Nelson’s future teammates, Power and Dahlin, he is of the rare right-shot variety which could help balance out the pairings if he can shore up his defensive game. All in all, the Sabres got a steal snagging him at 41st overall, seeing that some rankings had him going as high as 20th. 

Ty Nelson North Bay Battalion
Ty Nelson, North Bay Battalion (Josh Kim / The Hockey Writers)

Baracchini’s Take

A possible first-round selection, Nelson drops here as the Sabres add another defender with great offensive upside. Nelson is a major competitor as he possesses great power, strength, mobility and a booming shot from the backend. He isn’t afraid of engaging in puck battles and does a great job of activating on the rush and on the cycle. He has improved defensively as the season progressed, but his confidence offensively is off the charts.

42. Anaheim Ducks: Simon Forsmark – LD, Örebro HK (SHL)

THW Writer: Alex Hobson

Having added a defenseman in Korchinski and a forward in McGroarty, I have the Ducks taking another defenseman with their first second round pick in Simon Forsmark. The Swedish defenseman is a rare case in the sense that arguably his best attribute for his age is his hockey IQ. He very rarely ever panics or makes a snap decision, which is the type of defenseman every coach dreams of having. When it comes to young defensemen, much of the time the decision-making and IQ traits come with maturity. But Forsmark is already there, and when you combine that with his size at 6-foot-2 and 194 pounds as well as his defensive awareness, the Ducks could have themselves a future rock-solid bottom pairing defenseman with ability to slide into the top four. 

Baracchini’s Take

Sometimes simplicity is the best way to achieve success. Simon Forsmark plays that simple game, effective and excels at it. He’s great in transition and on the attack with his breakout passing and control, but he’s very sound positionally with good gap control and coverage when on defense. They took a highly mobile defender in Kevin Korchinski in the first round, taking a reliable defender in Forsmark here is a great addition to fill out the Ducks depth.

43. Arizona Coyotes (via San Jose Sharks): Danny Zhilkin – C, Guelph Storm (OHL)

THW Writer: Andrew Forbes

Another six-foot option down the middle, Zhilkin had a coming out party of sorts in 2021-22 with 23 goals and 55 points in 66 games for the Guelph Storm. Having come over to the OHL, his game has already transitioned a bit to the North American way ahead of his draft year.

Related: 2022 NHL Entry Draft – Top 10 OHL Prospects

His vision is sneaky good and his playmaking abilities are somewhat underrated amongst his fellow draft prospects. At times, he’s shown NHL-calibre skill, but consistency might be his biggest hurdle. That said, he has a hard shot and finds his teammates off the rush to create high-danger opportunities and that’s going to drive a number of teams to have interest in acquiring him at the draft. 

Danny Zhilkin, Guelph Storm
Danny Zhilkin, Guelph Storm (Photo by Terry Wilson / OHL Images)

Baracchini’s Take

You can never have enough centres. After drafting Logan Cooley and Owen Beck in the first round, the Coyotes take another one with Danny Zhilkin. He always plays with a great level of pace and intensity. He’s active on the forecheck, possesses great speed and upper body strength to shield the puck and attack the net. He already possesses some NHL qualities that’ll translate to the next level. I was very high on him to start the season as a possible first-round pick. If he does drop this low, it will be a great selection.

44. Columbus Blue Jackets: Sam Rinzel, RD, Waterloo Blackhawks (USHL) 

THW Writer: Mark Scheig

If there’s one trend that’s developed in doing these mocks, it’s that there’s an abundance of good defensemen available in this part of the draft. Rinzel certainly fits that description. He doesn’t start college until the 2023-24 season and yet he’s already 6-foot-4 and still has yet to fill out. He’s an offensive, puck-moving defenseman who has shown improvement defensively. He’ll spend next season between high school and the USHL before starting at the University of Minnesota. He’ll have ample opportunity to round out his game and then become one of the Blue Jackets’ top prospects on the blue line along with Wisconsin’s Corson Ceulemans. He reminds me a lot of Scott Morrow, who went in the second-round last season. 

Baracchini’s Take

Mark makes the best comparison to Rinzel with Scott Morrow. Morrow is an extremely active defenseman always joining the rush. The difference here is that Rinzel has a better defensive foundation to his game. He engages on the rush but has the mindset to prioritize defense when he needs to. Although he made a nice transition from high school hockey to the USHL, he still needs to develop, though the potential remains.

45. Arizona Coyotes (via New York Islanders): Bryce McConnell-Barker – C, Soo Greyhounds (OHL)

THW Writer: Andrew Forbes

Another center? That’s right. The Coyotes depth down the middle has been an issue for some time and to grab a player who — at the start of the season — was being talked about as a potential first-round talent in the second round is a must-have for the team. His positioning is on point, he can shoot the puck and his vision is underrated because he was playing further down the Greyhounds lineup to start the year. That said, his skill showed up as he earned more minutes in the Soo and there’s a lot to like about this game. He has soft hands and transitions the game incredibly well, but should take a few more risks with the puck to open up his game. With that, he will find himself as a 2C at some point and a likely power play candidate when he cracks that NHL lineup. 

Bryce McConnell-Barker Sault Ste Marie Greyhounds
Bryce McConnell-Barker, Sault Ste Marie Greyhounds (Photo by Terry Wilson / OHL Images)

Baracchini’s Take

Out of all the players in this draft, I think McConnell-Barker doesn’t get enough attention. He plays a responsible two-way game as he provides great support for his teammates, while having a strong and accurate shot with great speed and hands. He didn’t have a strong start to the season production wise (missed season didn’t help), but he was able to find his footing as a rookie later on in the season. He could be a very strong second-line centre.

46. Washington Capitals (via Winnipeg Jets): Matyas Sapovaliv – C, Saginaw Spirit (OHL)

THW Writer: Mark Scheig

The Capitals again take advantage of good players falling to them by taking Sapovaliv here. He’s a playmaking center who is still developing into his 6-foot-4 frame. He came to Saginaw via the CHL Import Draft and did nothing to disappoint scoring 18 goals and 52 points in his debut OHL season. What won’t get enough attention is the fact that Sapovaliv is in one of the best places for development in Saginaw under coach Chris Lazary. His style allows for creativity to shine within structure. Cole Perfetti played under Lazary and thrived. Expect the same for Sapovaliv moving forward. 

Baracchini’s Take

Much like Pavel Mintyukov, Sapovaliv was a bright spot on a Spirit team that wasn’t strong all season. A two-way centre with NHL size, he’s an excellent play maker and puck distributor. He knows exactly where his teammates are with his awareness and displays great patience to draw in defenders and open the ice up. He has good hands and control in tight spaces and fends off players with such ease. 

47. Minnesota Wild (via Vancouver Canucks): Adam Sykora – HK Nitra (Slovakia)

THW Writer: Logan Horn

I went a bit off the board here taking Sykora in the middle of the second round, but I still think it was a steal. In my opinion, he’s one of the best defensive forwards in this draft class which he showed all year in the top Slovakian league where he scored 17 points in 46 games, all while providing his team with excellent defensive tenacity and forechecking and plenty of important minutes on the penalty kill. Oh, did I mention that he was 17 years old for the duration of the season? Sykora just barely made the cut-off for the 2022 Draft class as one of the youngest players eligible this year and he still provides some of the best defensive upside among forwards. Keep an eye on Sykora in the coming years. 

Baracchini’s Take

I don’t think this is an off the board pick at all. Sykora has shown great energy, compete and attitude all season long, as he’s been creeping up on draft boards to be a second-round selection. He plays with pace to attack the middle of the ice and is always active on the forecheck. He might be a bit overshadowed with the other Slovak players in this draft class, but you need to keep an eye on Sykora as he could be a solid middle-six winger.

48. Vegas Golden Knights: Nathan Gaucher – C, Québec Remparts (QMJHL)

THW Writer: Shawn Wilken

He may have dropped off a bit offensively this year, but Nathan Gaucher still put up solid numbers. He hit 31 goals with the Quebec Remparts, but what really excites us is his excellence on the defensive side. He’s tremendously reliable on the back-check and mixes a physical nature to round out a complete game that coaches dream of having. At 6-foot-3 and over 200 pounds, Gaucher is a big boy that can lower the shoulder and drop a hit, and he uses his weight well in front of the net. On a powerplay, teams will surely use him to make goaltenders lives hectic. 

Nathan Gaucher Quebec Remparts
Nathan Gaucher, Quebec Remparts (Photo: Jonathan Roy)

Baracchini’s Take

Gaucher was another player that could challenge for the first round as he possesses a two-way game and a power forward mentality. However, he managed to fall further than expected. To see him drop as far as he did is a big pick up for the Golden Knights. Guacher is a player that would thrive in today’s game, with his ability to be a factor down low and attack the net. He has a decent stride for his size, but can look to work on his speed. 

49. Seattle Kraken (via Nashville Predators): Filip Bystedt – C, Linköping HC (SHL)

THW Writer: Adam Kierszenblat

The Kraken score big as they draft Filip Bystedt at 49th. The high skilled Swedish center dominated the J20 this season with 49 points in 40 games. A two-way center, he is able to get back in the play defensively thanks to his powerful skating and knows where to set up in the defensive zone. On offense, he uses his strong puck handling skills to set up teammates for chances while also possessing a shot that is very strong and accurate. Look for him to be a force on the penalty kill and power play as he is the perfect combination of speed, skill and size. 

Baracchini’s Take

I love Bystedt’s game as he can be a major force on the ice. He tested well at the combine being in the top-25 in the aerobic fitness categories and anaerobic fitness mean power and fatigue index categories. He’s a smooth skater with great offensive awareness as he’s a versatile threat with his passing and shot. He shows great positioning defensively as he can get into the lanes and use his size to keep attackers to the outside. 

50. Dallas Stars: Mats Lindgren – D, Kamloops Blazers (WHL)

THW Writer: Devin Little

In what could eventually turn out to be an absolute steal in the last half of the second round, the Stars are able to snag a highly-skilled defenseman in Mats Lindgren. While Miro Heiskanen will continue to be Dallas’s rock on the blue line for the foreseeable future, adding Lindgren brings in a prospect that possesses top-tier offensive abilities and could develop into a high-end middle pairing defenseman in the NHL. Lindgren is a shifty defender who has good footwork that allows him to avoid pressure in tight situations, and once he gets into open ice, he can hit a teammate with a tape-to-tape pass. He has all the makings of a power play quarterback at the NHL level; how good of one depends on his development over the next couple of seasons. While he does need to add some muscle and his defensive work leaves much to be desired, this is a player with first round skill, and it’s not hard to imagine him tearing up the NHL alongside Stankoven, his teammate with the Kamloops Blazers.

Mats Lindgren Kamloops Blazers
Mats Lindgren, Kamloops Blazers (Allen Douglas / Kamloops Blazers)

Baracchini’s Take

I’ve always had a hard time to try and get a gauge on Lindgren. At times, he’s great with his offensive skillset as he has great mobility and can protect the puck extremely well. He can move the puck well with his crisp passing. However, I think his consistency overall and attention to detail isn’t there when it needs to be. The upside is there, but his reads can use some fine tuning.

51. Los Angeles Kings: Jack Hughes – C, Northeastern University (NCAA)

THW Writer: Austin Stanovich

Hughes dropped to me at 51 and felt like a no-brainer in this spot. A good at everything, great at nothing type of prospect, there’s a lot to like about his game. His potential ceiling is still unknown, but he has a high floor and should be a solid middle-six center in the future. The Kings are overloaded with center prospects, but Hughes is still a few seasons away and could provide an excellent one-two punch with Samuel Helenius in the team’s bottom six. 

Baracchini’s Take

Hughes was once viewed as first-round pick, but this to me feels like the perfect range to take him. A quick and strong skater with soft hands and great control, Hughes is a very effective playmaking centre. If he’s able to reach his floor, he could be a great energetic centreman for the Kings. 

52. Detroit Red Wings (via Capitals): Adam Ingram – F, Youngstown Phantoms (USHL)

THW Writer: Devin Little

If Solomonsson was a bit of a home run swing at 40th, Detroit’s second pick in the second round had to be used on a player that I felt had a reasonable shot at becoming an NHL player. In snagging Ingram, I think I was able to add a player who has the potential to be somewhat of a steal coming out of the back half of the second round. Another player that can play with pace, Ingram has solid offensive skills, producing 55 points in 54 games in the USHL this season. Committed to St. Cloud State University for next season, he projects to become a middle six forward that can play off of higher-skilled forwards while also being able to make plays for himself. He’s a player that could be molded into a few different “types” of players, and, at the very least, I could see him becoming a solid, no-nonsense fourth line forward in the NHL. 

Baracchini’s Take

For me, the verdict is still out on Ingram. He has the potential to be a possible top-six forward, but that’s best-case scenario. Ingram displays a great skillset with his shot and offensive awareness, but I don’t think that his production will translate to the pro level. With his energy and speed, he could be an effective depth piece.

53. Anaheim Ducks (via Pittsburgh Penguins): Vinzenz Rohrer – C, Ottawa 67s (OHL)

THW Writer: Alex Hobson

With two defensemen and one forward taken by the Ducks at this point, I felt the need to even it out by giving them another forward in Vinzenz Rohrer. The Austrian winger has been turning heads with his production in the OHL, notching 48 points in 64 games for the Ottawa 67s. He would have had a great stage to further impress scouts at the 2022 World Juniors, but didn’t get much of an opportunity with the tournament shutting down due to COVID-19 outbreaks early on. He has just as good of a compete level and motor as any prospect in this draft, which will win fans over regardless of how many points he puts up. If all goes according to plan with his development, I could see him panning into a middle six energy forward. 

Vinzenz Rohrer Ottawa 67's
Vinzenz Rohrer, Ottawa 67’s (Frankie Benvenuti / The Hockey Writers)

Baracchini’s Take

Rohrer doesn’t have an off-switch as he’s always involved with the play and being aggressive to gain possession of the puck. He has great off the puck awareness and speed to boot as he never quits on the play. He has great hands in tight spaces and is always active on the cycle with his foot speed and edge work. The Ducks have great depth in their top-six, Rohrer could be a really effective player in that regard, at worst, we could see him on the third line.

54. Montreal Canadiens (via Edmonton Oilers)­: Maveric Lamoureux – D, Drummondville Voltigeurs (QMJHL)

THW Writer: Blain Potvin

The second round finishes off with the addition of a massive framed defender. 6-foot-7 200 pound right-handed Maveric Lamoureux. He’s a mountain of a man with a mean streak in his game, but he is highly mobile and can impose his will in the defensive zone. His offensive game is raw and needs work but he is able to clear his own zone with the safest plays. 

Baracchini’s Take

Some saw Lamoureux as a first-round pick, but aside from his size, he doesn’t bring a whole lot to the table. This would probably be the best spot to take a swing at him as there’s some upside in regards to his defensive game. He plays a physical style and has good defensive awareness. He is able to get into the lanes to block a shot or break plays up with his long reach, but his mobility and pivots remain a big question mark. 

55. Boston Bruins: Hunter Haight – C, Barrie Colts (OHL) 

THW Writer: Brandon Share Cohen

The Boston Bruins love responsible, two-way forwards who can slot up and down their lineup and play in all situations. This is why Hunter Haight makes a lot of sense for them here with the 55th overall pick. A center who could benefit from adding to his frame, Haight can provide value in just about every area a team needs it and in all situations. The point production wasn’t where scouts wanted it to be this season, but a lot of that can be attributed to the lost OHL season due to COVID-19. His ability to score was actually underrated given how frequently he put the puck in the net relative to his shot total and he can impact the game with and without the puck on his stick. He’ll have a lot of eyes on him as the Bruins’ first pick of the 2022 NHL Entry Draft, but it’s important to remember that he was still selected at the tail-end of the second round; he’ll need time to develop. The 2022-23 season will be hugely important in determining what level prospect he truly is.

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Baracchini’s Take

Haight definitely didn’t have the draft season that he wanted after being a standout player at Team Canada’s summer showcase. However, as the season went on, you started to see the potential and upside that he has. He plays a high tempo game, a strong shot and can still be a strong two-way player with some bite to his game. He fits the mold of what it takes to play a Bruins style. The Bruins’ prospect board isn’t strong, but with Haight joining 2021 first rounder Fabian Lysell as the top prospects of the team, things might be starting to look up. 

56. Winnipeg Jets (via St. Louis Blues): Alexander Perevalov – LW, Loko Yaroslavl (MHL)

THW Writer: Dayton Reimer

After adding Geekie, the Gets grab another offensively gifted forward in Perevalov, who put up one of the best U18 seasons in Russia’s MHL this season, scoring 25 goals and 50 points in 42 games, and at one point, was even leading the league in points.

Related: 2022 NHL Draft’s Top 10 Russian Prospects

His stickhandling is arguably elite and combined with some deceptive mobility, he can easily bypass opponents and charge the net to create scoring chances. He’s not the greatest skater, but he works hard in every play and wants to be part of everything on the ice. 

Baracchini’s Take

Perevalov is a goal scoring threat and definitely has the skillset to be an offensive difference maker. He has a powerful shot on his off-wing as he has great accuracy and is extremely crafty when having control of the puck. Even though his skating mechanics isn’t the greatest he still has great speed to burst around defenders while lowering his shoulder to fend them off. The Jets getting a goal scorer this late in the second round is a big win.

57. Ottawa Senators (via Tampa Bay Lightning): Tyler Brennan – G, Prince George Cougars (WHL)

THW Writer: Dayton Reimer

Although Ottawa has a few talented goaltending prospects, there are concerns that they still don’t have a long-term solution in the net. There aren’t any home-run goalies available this year, but Tyler Brennan is still the best of the group. He had a fairly average regular season with the WHL’s Prince George Cougars, but after the departure of Taylor Gauthier, he was thrust into the starting role for the playoffs. Against the dominant Portland Winterhawks, he stood on his head, putting up a 1.86 goals-against average and a 0.954 save percentage, despite losing all four games. He’s an intriguing prospect, to say the least, and could very well end up a starter in the NHL. 

Baracchini’s Take

Personally, I wouldn’t take a goalie until later in the third or fourth round as it’s not a deep class. Though the Senators’ goaltending situation isn’t clear cut so it would make sense for them to add another one. They already have good prospects in Filip Gustavsson, Mads Sogaard and Leevi Meriläinen. It’s better to have good goaltending depth than none and by selecting Brennan, they add to their group. Brennan is probably the top goalie as he has great size, mobility, lateral movements and poise in the crease.

58. Winnipeg Jets (via New York Rangers): Julian Lutz – LW, EHC München (DEL)

THW Writer: Dayton Reimer

The Jets love big, aggressive players, and there aren’t many better fits in the second round than German star Julian Lutz. An injury kept him out of most of the 2021-22 season, but it appears that he’s back in top form since his return. His offensive instincts are top-notch, which were on full display at the 2022 U18 World Juniors, where he led the Germans with four points in four games. He is also an excellent skater and an aggressive forechecker, and at 6-foot-2, he’s already a handful for opposing defenders. Given some more time in the DEL – he only appeared in 14 games this season – he’ll almost certainly become a top prospect in the Jets’ system. 

Julian Lutz RB Muenchen
Julian Lutz, RB Muenchen (GEPA / RedBulls)

Baracchini’s Take

This is a Winnipeg Jets pick in its greatest form as they like to play an aggressive, yet offensive style of play. Lutz has the ability to play that style to a tee as he can be a thorn in players sides in the offensive zone. Despite not playing a lot in his draft year, Lutz was considered to be a fringe first rounder with his speed, shot and presence in physical situations. If he played more frequently, Lutz probably would be higher up on many rankings. At the draft combine when asked what animal he would be on and off the ice, Lutz said a jaguar. With his speed and strength, you can see why.

59. Chicago Blackhawks (via Minnesota Wild): Matthew Seminoff – RW, Kamloops Blazers (WHL)

THW Writer: Shawn Wilken

While some teams may shy away from his size, adding Matthew Seminoff to Chicago’s cupboards was something we couldn’t pass up on. He’s one of the hardest working prospects of his draft class, and he’s an all-around likeable kid. He works his butt off every shift, and his offensive production took off, from five goals in his rookie season to 26 this year. He’s tremendously fast, which translates well in an NHL that continues to put an emphasis on speed. We love his work ethic and have no doubt his attitude will rub off on those who play with him.

Baracchini’s Take

Seminoff is one of those players that just doesn’t stop, as he’s always thinking to attack with his attitude and mentality. He’s extremely quick on the attack and is always working hard in all three zones. He’s a talented playmaker but his shot is underrated. While he could be a third-round pick, getting him late in the second is a great move given how he continues to impress each season. 

60. Seattle Kraken (via Toronto Maple Leafs): Rieger Lorenz – C, Okotoks Oilers (AJHL)

THW Writer: Adam Kierszenblat

With the 60th pick, the Kraken add some depth to their prospect pool with Rieger Lorenz of the AJHL. He has committed to the University of Denver for next season but that shouldn’t deter Seattle from drafting him. The 6-foot-2 center was the AJHL rookie of the year with 85 points in 60 games. Where he thrives is his two-way play. He has quick footspeed that allows him to get to lose pucks and transition the play to the offensive zone. He’s also not afraid to get to the net and use his big frame to cause havoc in the crease. If he continues to develop as projected, it won’t be long before he is competing for a spot in the NHL.  

Rieger Lorenz Okotoks Oilers
Rieger Lorenz, Okotoks Oilers (Chad Goddard Photography)

Baracchini’s Take

The AJHL has done a really great job to develop NHL level talent and Lorenz is another example. A quick and agile player with his skating and acceleration, his size allows him to display excellent puck protection skills and his edgework allows him to get out of high-pressure situations. His competitive play was on display at the U18 World Championship, as he has great positing and the ability to provide timely stick checks and tie ups. This is a great late-round pick to fill out the Kraken’s depth on the wing. 

61. Calgary Flames: Jordan Dumais – RW, Halifax Mooseheads (QMJHL)

THW Writer: Dayton Reimer

The Flames have done well with undersized forwards, so they take a chance on Halifax Mooseheads’ right-wing Jordan Dumais, who finished third in the QMJHL with 109 points. He set a franchise record as well, surpassing Nikolaj Ehlers’ and Jonathan Drouin’s 17-year-old seasons. He’s very agile with the puck and able to avoid bigger opponents with ease, but he’ll need to improve that aspect of his game if he wants to remain effective at the next level. Yet, at just barely 18 years old, he’ll be one to watch in 2022-23 to see if he can surpass his own record. 

Baracchini’s Take

Dumais had a dominant season production wise. He’s quick with his feet, displays soft hands and is always attacking the high danger area. Because of his size and lack of strength, there’s the possibility that he might get overlooked. But you can’t deny the fact that he can produce offense. Once he adds some more muscle and weight, look out because he can be another version of Andrew Mangiapane.

62. Carolina Hurricanes: Isaiah George – D, London Knights (OHL)

THW Writer: Brandon Stanley

The Hurricanes used their first two picks on defensemen last year, too, and owner Tom Dundon is on record as saying he would rather “pay for defense” than draft it early. Still, and even with 2021 top pick Morrow looking like an absolute stud, I think George makes a lot of sense here for a pipeline that’s weakened a bit at the position in recent years. He’s not the offensive star that Morrow (to a lesser degree, Aleksi Heimosalmi, the second defenseman taken in 2021) is, and is unlikely to ever be. George is an elite skater, has good size at 6-foot-1 and just under 200 pounds, and has a versatility to his game that would make him a great fit in the Carolina system down the road. The lefty played on both the left and right sides for the London Knights, and showcased the puck-moving proficiency – especially in transition – that could speak to the untapped offensive upside. Perhaps he could follow in the footsteps of another slick-skating, “lower-ceiling” type that has turned out pretty well in Carolina, Jaccob Slavin

Isaiah George London Knights
Isaiah George, London Knights (Photo by Luke Durda/OHL Images)

Baracchini’s Take

Despite probably not being a high-point producing defender in the NHL, George projects to be a very solid defender in a shut-down role with his size and defensive play. Unlike other defensive defenseman, he has no problem joining the rush as he’s a very smooth skater in transition with his speed and displays excellent control. If the production does come around, you have a very underrated two-way defender on your hands.

63. New York Islanders (via Colorado Avalacnhe): Tomas Hamara, D – New York Islanders

THW Writer: Logan Horn

Tomas Hamara is a player I was surprised to see fall to the New York Islanders at 63 because I believe he would be well worth a pick in the 50s somewhere. Hamara is an offensive defenceman who excels in transition with fluid skating and a well-developed playmaking game. He isn’t all about the offense though as his ability to shut down opposing teams’ rushes is solid and he rarely makes costly mistakes in his own zone. After splitting last season between the Finnish U20 league and the Finnish Liiga, Hamara will return to his pro-team, Tappara, and most likely play another full season there where I expect both his role and production to increase respectably. 

Baracchini’s Take

With no big-name defensive prospects in the system, the Islanders could have a steady, two-way defender with great speed in Hamara. He has great playmaking abilities, shows great patience to evaluate his options and spot his teammates. Whether it’s a long stretch pass or quick touches, Hamara has the awareness to make timely plays.

64. Seattle Kraken (via Florida Panthers): Cruz Lucius – RW, USNTDP

THW Writer: Sean Raggio

Cruz Lucius could be a steal to close out Round 2. Teams may have passed on him due to a limited viewing because of injuries, but that doesn’t take away from his goal-scoring ability, which is why the Kraken need him. The Kraken scored 213 goals last season, just seven away from league-least. He considers himself a goal scorer, and after some time at the college level where he can add size, he could be a wonderful slot option for 2021 second-overall pick Matty Beniers to find in just a few years’ time. Imagine a line of Jared McCann and Lucius centered by Beniers one day. 

Cruz Lucius USNTDP
Cruz Lucius, USNTDP (Jenae Anderson / The Hockey Writers)

Baracchini’s Take

The younger brother of Winnipeg Jets prospects Chaz, Cruz is definitely just as quick and lethal as his older brother. He can utilize all spaces on the ice and has a quick release when he finds those open areas. He’s a very underrated playmaker as he can connect on the cross seam or execute quick give-and-go’s. He has the drive and skill to possibly vault into the first round if he didn’t miss the amount of games he did.

Final Thoughts

The Coyotes, Devils and Sabres came away with some steals in the draft as they drafted first-round talents in the second with Trikozov (36), Mešár (37) and Nelson (41) respectively. 

Despite having only one pick, I thought the Bruins made a great selection with Haight (55) as he was a promising name at the start of the season. If he follows up with a solid season after his draft year, Haight could be another weapon in their system.

The Jets getting a goal scoring winger in Perevalov (56) and a power forward with great speed in Lutz (58) also stood out as some great selections for a team that had high hopes of making the playoffs this season.

Some names that I’m high on that weren’t taken in this round were Noah Warren (Gatineau Olympiques), Viktor Neuchev (Avto Yekaterinburg), Vladimir Grudinin (Krasnaya Armiya Moskva) and Paul Ludwinski (Kingston Frontenacs).

What do you think of the selections? Have your say in the comment section below. Here is a recap of the selections in the second round.

PickTeamSelection
33Montreal CanadiensDavid Goyette 
34Arizona CoyotesLane Hutson 
35Seattle KrakenChristian Kyrou 
36Arizona Coyotes (via Philadelphia Flyers)Gleb Trikozov 
37New Jersey DevilsFilip Mešár 
38Chicago BlackhawksTristan Luneau 
39Ottawa SenatorsMattias Hävelid 
40Detroit Red WingsElias Solomonsson 
41Buffalo SabresTy Nelson 
42Anaheim DucksSimon Forsmark 
43Arizona Coyotes (via San Jose Sharks): Danny Zhilkin 
44Columbus Blue JacketsSam Rinzel
45Arizona Coyotes (via New York Islanders)Bryce McConnell-Barker 
46Washington Capitals (via Winnipeg Jets)Matyas Sapovaliv 
47Minnesota Wild (via Vancouver Canucks)Adam Sykora 
48Vegas Golden KnightsNathan Gaucher 
49Seattle Kraken (via Nashville Predators)Filip Bystedt 
50Dallas StarsMats Lindgren 
51Los Angeles KingsLos Angeles Kings
52Detroit Red Wings (via Washington Capitals): Adam Ingram 
53Anaheim Ducks (via Pittsburgh Penguins)Vinzenz Rohrer 
54Montreal Canadiens (via Edmonton Oilers)­Maveric Lamoureux 
55Boston BruinsHunter Haight 
56Winnipeg Jets (via St. Louis Blues) Alexander Perevalov
57Ottawa Senators (via Tampa Bay Lightning)Tyler Brennan 
58Winnipeg Jets (via New York Rangers)Julian Lutz 
59Chicago Blackhawks (via Minnesota Wild)Matthew Seminoff 
60Seattle Kraken (via Toronto Maple Leafs)Rieger Lorenz 
61Calgary Flames Jordan Dumais 
62Carolina HurricanesIsaiah George 
63New York Islanders (via Colorado Avalacnhe)Tomas Hamara
64Seattle Kraken (via Florida Panthers)Cruz Lucius 

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